Types of Business Writing: The Persuasive Request

There are many types of business writing that you may come across or need to use one type is “persuasive request”. In business, you sometimes need to ask a client or another business for a favour. Whether you are needing a favour from a client or another business it is important to remember that your request is more likely to be granted if you can communicate the direct and indirect benefits to the one granting the favour. (2016, Essentials of Business Communication)

In business writing, when getting ready to write a persuasive request you should plan the following:

  1. Gain Attention– Do this in the opening paragraph of the message by describing a problem, mentioning a benefit, paying the reader a compliment, making an unexpected statement, or posing a stimulating question.
  2. Build Interest– In the body of the message, it is important to keep the reader’s attention and convince them that the request made of them is reasonable. This is also the area of the message where you need to communicate the direct and indirect benefits to them that will come about when they help you out. *Remember that everyone is “tuned into WII-FM, or what’s in it for me?”* People need to have a reason or benefit in order to help.
  3. Reduce Resistance– Think like the receiver when writing the message and anticipate the problems the receiver may have with the request. Communicate about these problems and offer a solution. Spin the problems into solutions.
  4. Motivate Action– To complete a persuasive message you (the sender) must tell the receiver what you want and when you want it. This is a call to action. The goal is to be confident, not pushy and to motivate the receiver to act on the message. Give a deadline date for a special offer that will be given to those that say “yes” promptly.

Persuasive messages can be hard to write until you have practice with them. Everybody wants something and everybody needs something. If you can figure out what the wants and needs are you are set. We will cover other types of business writing in later articles. Here is a great book called “Business Writing For Dummies” View it on Amazon here.

Go forth and communicate.

Cheers,

The Other Half

 

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Delicate Situation Writing

In this post, we will look at delicate situation writing. Not everything in business is wine and roses. Sometimes you have to say “no” to a client’s request. Whether what they are asking you do is against company policy or their request is just over-the-top and goes too far, it is important to know how to communicate a “no” to a client. It is not positive when saying “no” and could  end a business relationship or creates bad reviews of your business. You cannot please all the people all the time but you can learn to say “no” without ever having to say it. This is not easy to do but it is possible.

Here are some goals to think about and consider when communicating negative news.

  • Explain clearly and completely– the message you convey should be clear so that the receiver can understand and accept the information.

You can communicate that you have empathy and sensitivity for the situation all while being fair to both the client and your business.

  • Project a professional image– strive to project a professional image of yourself and your business. Even when a client is irate, emotional, and possibly abusive you should remain calm and professional so that you can do your best to communicate the reasoning behind the negative message.
  • Be fair– receivers of negative news are more likely to accept the decision when they feel that they have been treated fairly.
  • Maintain a friendly relationship– make an effort to use statements that show your desire to continue the business relationship. You wish to regain the confidence of your client and that should be communicated.
  • Deal with the situation in a timely manner. The longer a problem is left to brew the harder it will be to convert a negative into a positive. Clients want to know that their concerns or opinions are respected and the best way to make them feel that is to be timely with your response. (2016, Essentials of Business Communications). There is a great book called “Business Writing For Dummies”. View it here on Amazon

I know from experience that delicate situation writing can be tricky but it does become easier. It is like exercising a muscle, at first it is tough but when you use the muscle regularly the heavy lifting is easier to do. I wish you well in all of your client communication.

Cheers,

The Other Half

 

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